Dems Pull Out stops, Prez and Veep Rally Cleveland

Dems and GOP face off

GOP and Dems face off Tuesday

OBAMA: “America is like a car . . . We want the gearshift to be in ‘D’, to move forward. Not ‘R’, where the Republicans want to take us backward.”

By Bronson Peshlakai

Cleveland State University welcomes President Barack Obama and Vice-President Joe Biden to Cleveland on Oct. 31, 2010.

CLEVELAND — President Barack Obama along with Vice-President Joe Biden stopped by Cleveland Sunday afternoon to lend support to Ohio Democrat candidates in a last-ditch effort to keep Democratic control in the legislature with only two days to go until Election Day.

"Moving American Forward" rally with President Obama and Vice-President Joe Biden at the Cleveland State University Wolstein's Auditorium on Oct. 31, 2010.

Rallying support to “keep America moving forward,” Obama said the country was like a car. Prior to his election as president in 2008, Republicans were the driver of this car. The drivers then drove the car into a ditch where it got stuck. The president said when he took office, Democrats had to rappel into this ditch and push the car free. With the Dems now the driver of the car, the GOP right now wants the keys back. Obama said, the car is free of the mud, no help to the Republicans watching from above, some kicking dirt into the ditch on the Dems.

“The car is back on the road. And, it is pointing in the right direction,” Obama said. “We need to get the car moving forward now. We want the gearshift to be in ‘D’, not in ‘R’ where the Republicans want to take us backward, but ‘D’, so we can move the car, America, forward.”

President Barack Obama tells an audience in Cleveland to support all the Democrat candidates in Ohio, in order to "American Moving Forward," on Halloween.

The crowd cheered wildly. Both Obama and Biden praised Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland as one of the greatest governors in America. Strickland was seen dancing on the sideline while Grammy award-winning artist “Comment” played several songs during the rally.

While Obama was speaking, two men in their 20s sitting toward the back of Cleveland State University’s Wolstein Auditorium, began jeering loudly. Obama faltered, but the crowd overcame the distraction by shouting louder in support of the President.

Press cameras whipped around to catch the jeerers being led out by U.S. Secret Service Uniformed Officers while the president went on with his speech.

After the rally, organizers encouraged people to vote early at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections building, about five blocks away from the auditorium.

One thing prominent on all the candidate’s minds at they address people at this rally is the fact that every race in the state have narrow margins of competition. Strickland reminded rallygoers that in 2008, the election was so close that it could be averaged out that if every precinct in the state could have had one less vote, he wouldn’t be governor. With that in mind, organizers were signing people up to volunteer to canvass neighborhoods and make telephone calls from Sunday until Tuesday, in order to make one last-ditch effort to urge citizens to the polls this Tuesday — because Democrats could lose this race, if by just one vote.

A group of Democratic supporters wait in line for nearly two hours outside Cleveland State University's Wolstein Auditorium on Oct. 31, 2010. Photo courtesy of a kind gentlemen who had this picture snapped with his camera phone.